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Important Information for Students on Moodle Course Availability

You may not see a full list of all your expected courses in your Moodle My Courses list or in this category. This does not necessarily mean that your course registrations are incorrect. There are two possible reasons:

  • Departments/Tutors make courses visible to Students in Moodle when the course is ready for teaching
  • Not all courses use Moodle.

You can use the Study tab in Campus Connect to check the courses you are registered for or contact your department who can also provide information on their use of Moodle.

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20-21 EN2206: Gaskell,Eliot & Dickens

This course does not use Moodle for teaching at this time. For more information, please contact your department or the course tutor.
Teacher (Course Author): Ruth Livesey

20-21 EN5114: Supplementary Discourses

EN5114: Supplementary Discourses (20 credits) Teaching: Autumn, 1.5 hours per week Assessment: one essay of 3000-4000 words

Your workshop for your chosen pathway and Supplementary Discourses seminar will usually be taught on the same day. See timetable here for times and locations:
https://webtimetables.royalholloway.ac.uk/SWS/SDB1920SWS/Login.aspx
Part timers will take Supplementary Discourses in their second year

Scroll down this page for weekly reading lists and handouts for each strand.
You can also find reading lists here: https://rhul.rl.talis.com/modules/en5114.html

Tutorials and supervisions are by arrangement.

KEY TEACHING STAFF:
Fiction
Dr Eley Williams: Eley.Williams@rhul.ac.uk
Dr Anna Whitwham Anna.Whitwham@rhul.ac.uk
Ms Nadifa Mohamed Nadifa.Mohamed@rhul.ac.uk

Literary Non-Fiction
Dr Sean Borodale: Sean.Borodale@rhul.ac.uk
Professor Lavinia Greenlaw: Lavinia.Greenlaw@rhul.ac.uk
Dr Eley Williams: Eley.Williams@rhul.ac.uk

Poetry
Dr Sean Borodale: Sean.Borodale@rhul.ac.uk
Professor Lavinia Greenlaw: Lavinia.Greenlaw@rhul.ac.uk
Dr Eley Williams: Eley.Williams@rhul.ac.uk

Poetic Practice
Professor Redell Olsen: Redell.Olsen@rhul.ac.uk

Assessment (20 credits)
An essay of 3,000 – 4,000 words for Supplementary Discourses will be submitted for feedback at the beginning of the Spring Term. This is a formative submission which means that it is not formally graded. You will receive feedback and an indicative grade. Under the guidance of your tutor, you then revise this work and resubmit it at the beginning of the Summer Term. It is then a summative submission and is formally assessed.

Deadlines for assessments will be released to students at the start of the year, and will be reflected on the online turnitin submission boxes on the relevant Moodle pages.

Students should submit all written work online via the Turnitin box at the top of the Supplementary Discourses Introduction on the Supplementary Discourses home page. All work submitted on Turnitin should be anonymous and submitted by candidate number only.

You may also required to submit two printed copies to Bedford Square by the deadline of midday - you can confirm whether this is necessary with your individual tutor. These also need to be anonymous and identified by candidate number only.

You should make your candidate number the title of the submission, along with the name of your workshop tutor and confirmation of which course you are submitting work for (eg, ‘1809678 Supplementary Discourses ’). All work is due at midday.

Marking Criteria
Please refer to the PGT Handbook for the marking criteria for essays and the dissertation, and important regulations on the style and formatting of written work.

Word Limits

Word limits are there for a reason, so please adhere to them. Work which exceeds the upper word limit set will be penalised. Please do not exceed the word count – precise details of penalties can be found in the PGT Handbook.


Stepped Marking

The essay submitted for summative assessment in the summer term will be graded by using a set of marks with the pattern X2, X5 or X8. This means that a piece of work awarded Merit would be awarded 62%, 65% or 68%. This approach, which is called stepped marking, has been found to help in better aligning grades with marking criteria and for providing greater clarity to students about the standard of their work and how close they are to lower and upper grade boundaries. For example, a 62% represents a low Merit, while a 68% indicates a high Merit.