German

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21-22 GM1120: Introduction to German Studies

This module will provide you with an introduction to the rich and often strange world of cultural production from Germany and the German-speaking countries. Guided by introductory lectures that will steer you through relevant historical, political and theoretical contexts, you will study a fascinating range of material: poems, short stories, films and a novel.

A key theme running through the module will be ‘encounters’ of different types – for example with unfamiliar people and places, with new sensations and emotions, or with memories that have been repressed. Through these encounters our texts explore the major issues in modern German culture and society: questions of personal and national identity; trauma and memory of war and the Holocaust; the experience of migration and integration; and the problematic inheritance of ‘guilt’ that continues to be relevant to Germany today.
Teacher (Course Author): Jon Hughes, Emily Jeremiah

21-22 GM1601: German Ab Initio Written I

Assessment:
GM1601 written exam: OBE = Open Book Exam in term 3 (Monday, 9 May 2022) - 100%

GM1602 oral exam: a presentation and a dialogue (approx. five minutes in total) in term 3 (Friday, 27 May 2022) - 100%

Two different tasks:

Task 1talking about yourself - you as a person, your studies, other aspects of your life (e.g. family, hobbies, etc.) approx. three minutes.

Task 2dialogue: you'll engage in a dialogue with your examiners on ONE of four pre-prepared topics (shopping for groceries/arranging to meet with friends/clothes shopping/at the doctor's) - approx. two minutes. 



21-22 GM1602: German Ab Initio Oral I

Assessment:

GM1601 written exam: OBE = Open Book Exam in term 3 (exact date tba)


GM1602 oral exam: a presentation and a dialogue (approx. five minutes in total) in term 3 (Friday, 27 May 2022)

Two different tasks:

Task 1talking about yourself - you as a person, your studies, other aspects of your life (e.g. family, hobbies, etc.) approx. three minutes.

Task 2: dialogue: you'll engage in a dialogue with your examiner on ONE of four pre-prepared topics (shopping for groceries/arranging to meet with friends/clothes shopping/at the doctor's) - approx. two minutes. 




21-22 GM1701: German Advanced Written I

GM1701

GM1701 is a compulsory Year 1 Language Course. Students have to attend 3 weekly lessons + a fortnightly grammar lecture (Intermediate):

  1. Grammar
  2. Comprehension
  3. Oral Practice
  4. Grammar Lecture (fortnightly, please refer to "Language Skills" site on MOODLE)

ASSESSMENT:

3-Hour Written assessment (100%):

  • Grammar
  • Composition
  • Comprehension

     

    21-22 GM1702: German Advanced Oral I

    Oral exam - weighting 100%:
    Term 3 (Wednesday 25 May, 2022)

    You are required to give a presentation (live via MS Teams) that relates to ONE of two themes studied in the Comprehension/Practical component of GM1701. These two themes are:

    1. Deutsche Regionen

    2. Jugend in Deutschland

    After the delivery of your presentation you will have a discussion about your chosen topic with your two examiners. This will also be done on MS Teams. Please read the Word document attached above the orange arrow. Danke.



    21-22 GM2009: German Language II

    GM2009

    GM2009 (Full Unit) is a compulsory Year 2 Language Course. Students have to attend 3 weekly lessons + a fortnightly grammar lecture (Intermediate)

    1. Grammar/Business German
    1. Comprehension
    1. Oral Practice
    1. Grammar Lecture (fortnightly, please refer to "Language Skills" site on MOODLE)
    ASSESSMENT:


    3-hour Written Open Book Examination (50%) :

    • Business German letter
    • Comprehension
    • Commentary
    English/German - German/English or German monolingual dictionaries are allowed for the written examination. 


    Oral Examination (50%)
    You will be expected to deliver a presentation (Thursday, 26 May 2022) about one of the two main topics studied in the 'comprehension' component of GM2009. The two topics are:
    1. Heimat & kulturelle Identität
    2. Soziale Gerechtigkeit in Deutschland

    ---------------------------------

    Extensions and Extenuating Circumstances

     ·         Extensions without evidence before deadline for TWO x TWO working-day extensions and TWO x FIVE working-day extensions (total per student per year).

    ·         Extenuating Circumstances (ECs) for unforeseeable circumstances beyond your control). Evidence required; apply as soon as you can; outcome after Exam Boards.

     Support

    Consult your Personal Tutor, course tutors and the Humanities Office and Help Desk (Humanities-school@royalholloway.ac.uk) for advice, and access support from:

    ·         Student Advisory and Wellbeing services

    ·          Counselling support

    ·          Support for disabilities and neurodiversity 

    ·         Online support for your academic studies

    PLEASE NOTE THAT IN ORDER TO PASS THE CORE LANGUAGE UNIT YOU MUST OBTAIN AN OVERALL PASS MARK (AVERAGE OF THE WRITTEN AND ORAL EXAM MARKS) AND PASS THE FINAL WRITTEN EXAMINATION.

    21-22 GM2010: Intensive German for Beginners II

    TEACHING:

    5.5 hours / week
    (five weekly sessions with Ms Barbara Rassi, one fortnightly grammar lecture with Ms Dorothee Fowkes. Please refer to timetable.)

    ASSESSMENT:

    written examination (50%) = OBE, Open Book Exam in term 3 (Monday, 16 May 2022)
    one oral examination (50%) in term 3 (Thursday, 26 May 2022)


    PLEASE NOTE THAT IN ORDER TO PASS THE CORE LANGUAGE UNIT YOU MUST OBTAIN AN OVERALL PASS MARK (AVERAGE OF THE WRITTEN AND ORAL EXAM MARKS) AND PASS THE FINAL WRITTEN EXAMINATION.

    21-22 GM2124: Representations of Childhood and Youth in Modern German Culture

    Childhood and youth - the formative periods in our lives - are of obvious crucial importance for individuals, for society and for culture. They have also been contested and controversial concepts. Children and adolescents have long been the subject of social, familial and educational pressures against which they have often rebelled in the attempt to assert individuality and develop their own identities. This course aims to introduce students to a range of literary and cinematic responses to the lives of children and young people in the context of the German-speaking countries between the late nineteenth century and the present day. Using a range of classic and recent texts and films, it will explore the historical contexts of the theme, and consider the way broader social, political and ethical issues that emerge from the representation of young people, and of institutions such as the school and the military.
    Teacher (Course Author): Jon Hughes, Emily Jeremiah

    21-22 GM2501: Pra Oral In German

    This course does not use Moodle for teaching at this time. For more information, please contact your department or the course tutor.

    21-22 GM2502: Pra Oral In German

    This course does not use Moodle for teaching at this time. For more information, please contact your department or the course tutor.

    21-22 GM3009: German Language III

    GM3009 (Full Unit) is a compulsory core language course at final year level.

    The course will be taught with 3 hours / week + a fortnightly grammar lecture (Advanced)
    1. Essay
    1. Germany - past and present
    1. Oral Practice
    1. Grammar Lecture (fortnightly, please refer to "Language Skills" site on MOODLE)
    ASSESSMENT:
    3-Hour Written Examination (50%)
    • Erörterung (German essay)
    • comprehension and Stellungnahme (gestern&heute module/Germany past and present)

    Oral Examination (50%)

    In term 3 (Thursday, 28 April 2022) you are required to kindly deliver a presentation (approx. 7-10 minutes long) on a topic of your choice. Your presentation will be followed by a discussion with your examiners (approx. 5-7 minutes long). Your presentation topic has to be related to a German-speaking country. You choose the topic, however, it needs to be approved of by your Oral Practice tutor. For this purpose you will have to fill out and submit a so-called 'Themenblatt' (by 28 of February, 2022, 4:00pm). Note that you will be penalised if, in the exam, you read your presentation.


    FOR THE ATTENTION OF ALL STUDENTS OF LANGUAGE:
    PLEASE NOTE THAT IN ORDER TO PASS THE FINAL YEAR CORE LANGUAGE UNIT
    YOU MUST PASS BOTH THE FINAL ORAL EXAMINATION AND THE FINAL WRITTEN EXAMINATION.

    ************************

    Extensions and Extenuating Circumstances

     Extensions without evidence before deadline for TWO x TWO working-day extensions and TWO x FIVE working-day extensions (total per student per year).

    Extenuating Circumstances (ECs) for unforeseeable circumstances beyond your control). Evidence required; apply as soon as you can; outcome after Exam Boards.

     

    Support

    Consult your Personal Tutor, course tutors and the Humanities Office and Help Desk (Humanities-school@royalholloway.ac.uk) for advice, and access support from:

    ·        Student Advisory and Wellbeing services

    ·         Counselling support

    ·         Support for disabilities and neurodiversity 

    ·        Online support for your academic studies


     

    21-22 GM3133: Dark Tales. E.T.A. Hoffmann and German Romanticsm

    In this course we want to focus on German Romanticism's fascination with what was perceived as the "night side" of (human) nature. In response to the Enlightement's belief in rationality and objectivity Romantic writers tended to explore the more subjective and irrational aspects of life, like emotions and imagination, but also more unsettling psychological phenomena like dreams, hallucinations and mental illness.
    E.T.A. Hoffmann is widely regarded as the undisputed master of dark, frightening and often bizarre tales whose protagonists experience their worlds as inexplicable and frightening places that drive them to the brink of insanity. The human psyche here appears to be unstable and easily influenced by factors beyond the individual's conscious control. The self is perceived as divided into "day" and "night" sides and notions of a unified stable identity become questionable. In our analyses of Hoffmann's texts we will explore themes and motifs such as the doppelgänger, the signifiance of dreams, the blurring of boundaries between sanity and insanity, the artist's role in society and the uncanny. Furthermore, we will discuss the author's specific mode of writing and select critical approaches to Hoffmann. While focusing on Hoffmann we will also consider a range of poems/excerpts from other Romantic authors in order to gain a better understanding of the period.

    21-22 GM3134: National Socialism and the Third Reich in German film and visual culture from 1933 to the present

    The course covers the period of the Third Reich to present-day Germany. You will study a broad range of examples of the visual representation of National Socialism as an ideology, a political movement and a 'national' phenomenon. Starting in the 1930s and 1940s, you will be introduced to National Socialism in its historical context and asked to consider its defining characteristics. You will consider the Nazis’ use of propaganda and ceremony, focusing on film and graphic and fine art under Hitler. The course will then focus on the aftermath of the war in both West and East Germany, and the problematic idea of the 'Zero Hour'. You will consider early attempts to 'come to terms' with the past. The debates around Vergangenheitsbewältigung (coming to terms with the past) provide the focus for the next part of the course. You will study the depiction of perpetrators/victims, and of moral ambiguity before moving on to analyse the debates around German national responsibility for the Holocaust in the context of depictions of the failure of memory and denial in German film of the 1980s and 1990s, and conclude by studying the more recent trend towards 'normalization' in films incorporating 'ordinary' Germans and/or 'good Germans'. Throughout, you will comparatively consider the role of visual art in the above debates and trends, using the post-war work of Anselm Kiefer as a case studies, alongside analysis of site-specific memorials.
    Teacher (Course Author): Jon Hughes, Mel Phillips